Garlic Nature Super Food

Garlic (Allium Sativum) : “Nature’s Super Food”, health benefits are well researched in the scientific literature, from lowering the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke, to anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial properties. 

Garlic and cardioprotection: insights into the molecular mechanisms.

Abstract

Garlic is widely recognized for its immense therapeutic potential. Garlic has been shown to exert its beneficial effects against a wide spectrum of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and microbial infections, as well as immunological and cardiovascular disorders. Most of the research on garlic has indicated that garlic and its active compounds are effective in reducing cardiovascular and metabolic risk by normalizing abnormal plasma lipids, oxidized low density lipoproteins, abnormal platelet aggregation, high blood pressure, and cardiac injury. Some of the beneficial effects of dietary garlic against cardiovascular disorders are mediated via the generation of hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Garlic has the potential to protect the heart against myocardial infarction, doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, arrhythmia, hypertrophy, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The induction of cardiac endogenous antioxidants and the reduction of lipid peroxidation by garlic has been reported by several different groups. Other mechanisms, such as regulating ion channels, modulating Akt signaling pathways, histone deacetylase inhibition, and cytochrome P450 inhibition, could be responsible for the cardioprotective effect of garlic. Although several mechanisms have been identified for the cardioprotective effect of garlic, there is a need for further research to identify the specific molecular mechanism of cardioprotection in different cardiac diseases.

Anti-Cancer Effect of Thiacremonone through Down Regulation of Peroxiredoxin 6.

Thiacremonone (2, 4-dihydroxy-2, 5-dimethyl-thiophene-3-one) is an antioxidant substance as a novel sulfur compound generated from High-Temperature-High-Pressure-treated garlic. Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) is a member of peroxidases, and has glutathione peroxidase and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) activities. Several studies have demonstrated that PRDX6 stimulates lung cancer cell growth via an increase of glutathione peroxidase activity. A docking model study and pull down assay showed that thiacremonone completely fits on the active site (cys-47) of glutathione peroxidase of PRDX6 and interacts with PRDX6. Thus, we investigated whether thiacremonone inhibits cell growth by blocking glutathione peroxidase of PRDX6 in the human lung cancer cells, A549 and NCI-H460. Thiacremonone (0-50 ?g/ml) inhibited lung cancer cell growth in a concentration dependent manner through induction of apoptotic cell death accompanied by induction of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, p21 and p53, but decrease of xIAP, cIAP and Bcl2 expression. Thiacremonone further inhibited glutathione peroxidase activity in lungcancer cells. However, the cell growth inhibitory effect of thiacremonone was not observed in the lung cancer cells transfected with mutant PRDX6 (C47S) and in the presence of dithiothreitol and glutathione. In an allograft in vivo model, thiacremonone (30 mg/kg) also inhibited tumor growth accompanied with the reduction of PRDX6 expression and glutathione peroxidase activity, but increased expression of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, p21 and p53. These data indicate that thiacremonone inhibits tumor growth via inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity of PRDX6 through interaction. These data suggest that thiacremonone may have potentially beneficial effects in lung cancer.

 

Alliin, a garlic (Allium sativum) compound, prevents LPS-induced inflammation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

Abstract

Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been used to alleviate a variety of health problems due to its high content of organosulfur compounds and antioxidant activity. The main active component is alliin (S-allyl cysteine sulfoxide), a potent antioxidant with cardioprotective and neuroprotective actions. In addition, it helps to decrease serum levels of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and uric acid, as well as insulin resistance, and reduces cytokine levels. However its potential anti-inflammatory effect is unknown. We examined the effects of alliin in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes by RT-PCR, Western blot, and microarrays analysis of 22,000 genes. Incubation of cells for 24 h with 100 ?mol/L alliin prevented the increase in the expression of proinflammatory genes, IL-6, MCP-1, and Egr-1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to 100 ng/mL LPS for 1 h. Interestingly, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which is involved in LPS-induced inflammation in adipocytes, was decreased following alliin treatment. Furthermore, the gene expression profile by microarrays evidentiate an upregulation of genes involved in immune response and downregulation of genes related with cancer. The present results have shown that alliin is able to suppress the LPS inflammatory signals by generating an anti-inflammatory gene expression profile and by modifying adipocyte metabolic profile.

 

About the author: Dr. Mordy Levy

 

Dr. Mordy Levy is possibly the only Canadian doctor to have graduated from three first professional doctorates in separate and distinct health care professions: Chiropractic Medicine (DC)-1997, Allopathic Medicine (MD)-2006, Naturopathic Medicine (ND)-2011, graduated Summa Cum Laude, from the prestigious National University of Health Sciences (Chicago, IL) and was the valedictorian of his graduating class.

Dr Levy's first undergraduate degree (BSc) was in Biology and Psychology from York University, graduated with Honours, and his second undergraduate degree (BMSc) was in Human Biology and Biomedical sciences from National University of Health Sciences (Chicago, IL)

Dr. Levy is a registered member in good standing with three distinct health professions in Ontario, namely the College of Chiropractors of Ontario, the College of Naturopaths of Ontario, in addition to the College of Homeopaths of Ontario.

Dr. Levy is board certified in Functional Medicine and is a professional member of the Institute of Functional Medicine, the Canadian Society of Orthomolecular Medicine, American College of Nutrition, in addition to the Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors, the Ontario Chiropractic Association and the Ontario Homeopathic Association.

Always an avid lifelong learner, Dr. Levy completed numerous postgraduate certifications in Functional Medicine, Clinical Nutrition, Medical Acupuncture, Homeopathic Medicine, in addition to Prolotherapy regenerative medicine. His clinical interests are in Neurological, Autoimmune, Hormonal and Gastrointestinal Dysfunctions.
On a personal noted: Dr. Levy enjoys spending time with his three boys, practicing TaeKwonDo and reviewing research articles.

Website: http://www.DrLevy.ca